Add the data disk to the Virtual Machine Redhat in Azure Cloud Services

Attach or detach data disk to the VM Redhat in Azure cloud

  1. Login to Azure portal and go to the Virtual Machine VM section.
  2. Go to the Disk panel from left side.

3. On Disk section one disk shown as the disk for OS and its is temporary disk. We lost data if we keep it on disk when we stop the Virtual Machine. Below on Same Panel, we have option to Create the Data disk highlighted as shown below.

3. After press Create and attach a disk , we will fill the data associated like LAN , Disk Name, Storage type, size , IOPS, encryption. After choose Press SAVE button for creating Disk and attached to VM.

4. Attach Disk: If you want to attach any existing disk which is present by using ATTACH EXISTING DISKS.

5. Detach Disk: If you want to Detach the existing disk then you press X sign at last of disk panel and press SAVE for conform.

6. After adding disk from Azure portal. Connect the Redhat VM machine with putty window and check for df -h command for disk mapping.

[sunny@VM1 ~]$ df -h
Filesystem                 Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs                   3.8G     0  3.8G   0% /dev
tmpfs                      3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs                      3.9G  9.3M  3.9G   1% /run
tmpfs                      3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mapper/rootvg-rootlv  2.0G   77M  2.0G   4% /
/dev/mapper/rootvg-usrlv    10G  3.0G  7.1G  30% /usr
/dev/mapper/rootvg-tmplv   2.0G   47M  2.0G   3% /tmp
/dev/sdb1                  496M  148M  348M  30% /boot
/dev/mapper/rootvg-varlv   8.0G  493M  7.6G   7% /var
/dev/mapper/rootvg-homelv 1014M   50M  965M   5% /home
/dev/sdb15                 495M  6.9M  488M   2% /boot/efi
/dev/sda1                   16G   45M   15G   1% /mnt
tmpfs                      782M   12K  782M   1% /run/user/42
tmpfs                      782M  4.0K  782M   1% /run/user/1000

7. We need to use FDISK for create partition. We added 10 GB and 50GB disk from Azure portal.

[sunny@VM1 ~]$ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 16 GiB, 17179869184 bytes, 33554432 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xb73f50ba

Device     Boot Start      End  Sectors Size Id Type

Disk /dev/sdb: 64 GiB, 68719476736 bytes, 134217728 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: CDAD5075-3352-4838-B728-0BFB80489A18

Device       Start       End   Sectors  Size Type
/dev/sdb1  1026048   2050047   1024000  500M Linux filesystem
/dev/sdb2  2050048 134215679 132165632   63G Linux LVM
/dev/sdb14    2048     10239      8192    4M BIOS boot
/dev/sdb15   10240   1024000   1013761  495M EFI System

Partition table entries are not in disk order.


Disk /dev/sdc: 10 GiB, 10737418240 bytes, 20971520 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/sdd: 50 GiB, 53687091200 bytes, 104857600 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

7. We Create partition with FDISK for two attached disk in Azure portal. one is 10 GB and other is 50 GB.

[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo fdisk /dev/sdc

Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.32.1).
Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
Be careful before using the write command.

Device does not contain a recognized partition table.
Created a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0x256cac9b.

Command (m for help): n
Partition type
   p   primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free)
   e   extended (container for logical partitions)
Select (default p): p
Partition number (1-4, default 1):
First sector (2048-20971519, default 2048):
Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G,T,P} (2048-20971519, default 20971519):

Created a new partition 1 of type 'Linux' and of size 10 GiB.

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered.
Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Syncing disks.

[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo fdisk /dev/sdd

Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.32.1).
Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
Be careful before using the write command.

Device does not contain a recognized partition table.
Created a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0x437478e3.

Command (m for help): n
Partition type
   p   primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free)
   e   extended (container for logical partitions)
Select (default p): p
Partition number (1-4, default 1):
First sector (2048-104857599, default 2048):
Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G,T,P} (2048-104857599, default 104857599):

Created a new partition 1 of type 'Linux' and of size 50 GiB.

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered.
Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Syncing disks.

8. Make the filesystem of attached disk

[sunny@VM1 /]$ ls /dev/sd*
/dev/sda   /dev/sdb   /dev/sdb14  /dev/sdb2  /dev/sdc1  /dev/sdd1
/dev/sda1  /dev/sdb1  /dev/sdb15  /dev/sdc   /dev/sdd

[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo mkfs.xfs /dev/sdc -f
meta-data=/dev/sdc               isize=512    agcount=4, agsize=655360 blks
         =                       sectsz=4096  attr=2, projid32bit=1
         =                       crc=1        finobt=1, sparse=1, rmapbt=0
         =                       reflink=1
data     =                       bsize=4096   blocks=2621440, imaxpct=25
         =                       sunit=0      swidth=0 blks
naming   =version 2              bsize=4096   ascii-ci=0, ftype=1
log      =internal log           bsize=4096   blocks=2560, version=2
         =                       sectsz=4096  sunit=1 blks, lazy-count=1
realtime =none                   extsz=4096   blocks=0, rtextents=0

[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo mkfs.xfs /dev/sdd -f
meta-data=/dev/sdd               isize=512    agcount=4, agsize=3276800 blks
         =                       sectsz=4096  attr=2, projid32bit=1
         =                       crc=1        finobt=1, sparse=1, rmapbt=0
         =                       reflink=1
data     =                       bsize=4096   blocks=13107200, imaxpct=25
         =                       sunit=0      swidth=0 blks
naming   =version 2              bsize=4096   ascii-ci=0, ftype=1
log      =internal log           bsize=4096   blocks=6400, version=2
         =                       sectsz=4096  sunit=1 blks, lazy-count=1
realtime =none                   extsz=4096   blocks=0, rtextents=0

9. Make the directory for mount the both disk.

[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo mkdir /disk1
[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo mkdir /disk2

10. Mount the both disk in Redhat Virtual machine.

[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo mount /dev/sdc /disk1
[sunny@VM1 /]$ sudo mount /dev/sdd /disk2

11. Verify the disk is attached with df -h commands:

[sunny@VM1 /]$ df -h
Filesystem                 Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs                   3.8G     0  3.8G   0% /dev
tmpfs                      3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs                      3.9G  9.2M  3.9G   1% /run
tmpfs                      3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mapper/rootvg-rootlv  2.0G   77M  2.0G   4% /
/dev/sdb15                 495M  6.9M  488M   2% /boot/efi
/dev/sda1                   16G   45M   15G   1% /mnt

/dev/sdc                    10G  104M  9.9G   2% /disk1
/dev/sdd                    50G  390M   50G   1% /disk2

12. For permanent mount the disk on every reboot make an entry in /etc/fstab file.

sudo vi /etc/fstab
---Insert : for insert operation

/dev/sdc /disk1 xfs defaults 0 0
/dev/sdd /disk2 xfs defaults 0 0

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.